Tag Archives: coach approach

My Coach Approach Journey #2

Gym equiptment

The Coach Approach

It’s a free program offered at the YMCA for people who have not, in the past, been consistent exercisers. I’m one of those people. This is a record of my Coach Approach Journey.

If you haven’t read it – read My Coach Approach Journey #1 here.

Appointment #2…

A couple of weeks ago I had my second Coach Approach appointment with my wellness coach Daryl. We talked about how I had been doing with my exercise – what had I done, what had I enjoyed and what had I disliked. We set some short term goals to help me meet the long term goals we set in my first appointment.

Long Term Goal

Short Term Goals

Increase Flexibility
  • Stretch after workouts
  • Stretch everyday
Increase Strength
  • Exercise 3X/week
  • Fitlinxx Workout
Increase Stamina
  • Cardio 2X/week
  • Boost intensity
  • Walk as much as possible

I signed an agreement with Daryl that I would do my best to maintain this program of exercise until our next meeting in mid-March.

The FitLinxx set-up…

Daryl set me up on a collection of the FitLinxx machines. He showed me how to adjust the seats and such to find the correct fit for me, showed me how to use each machine, checked my technique, and suggested the number of reps I should do.

Barriers to exercise…

Daryl and I also talked about what barriers may be stopping me from exercising and how to overcome them.

Barrier 1: To exercise, I have to stop doing something more enjoyable
Overcome it: Reschedule my workout or work out at home

Barrier 2: I get bored when I’m exercising
Overcome it: Find a workout buddy (my husband?), bring an audio book to listen to

Barrier 3: I don’t like the exercise activity I am doing
Overcome it: Try something new – a group fitness class or swimming

My progress…

I’ll be honest with you, I’m having a hard time sticking to the agreement my wellness coach and I made. The barriers are doing their job right now…

I’m a lazy person, I’ve realized, and motivating myself to go exercise is difficult. I like sitting and reading, or just going home as soon as I’m done work. I find the bike and the elliptical boring, and the weight floor still intimidates me a little bit. More often than not, I’d rather just go do something else, anything else, other than exercise.

I’ve managed to get in an average of one workout a week. That’s a long way from my agreement with Daryl, but at least I’ve got one in.

I’m going to keep talking positively to myself to get motivated rather than discouraged about it. I’m also going to try a few more fitness classes and see if I can find something I like. Check back for my experiences in different fitness classes, I’ll let you know how they go!

 

If you’re interested in having a wellness appointment or participating in Coach Approach, sign up at member services at your YMCA Calgary location.


With a Little Help from your Y Friends

Are you like me? Do you have a new membership at the Y and aren’t really sure where to start with this whole exercise thing?

Have you tried to exercise but aren’t sure what to do? Have you started going to the gym only to have your motivation fizzle out after a few weeks or a few months? Or is the idea of going to the gym just a little too intimidating?

Research shows only 15 to 20% of exercisers typically maintain an exercise plan long enough to reap any benefits. People tend to lose interest and drop out. That’s why the YMCA offers the Coach Approach FREE to all our adult members.

That’s right – it’s free.

What is Coach Approach exactly?

It’s our way at YMCA Calgary to help you discover and stick to an exercise plan that will help you achieve your goals. The key component – creating a plan you’ll actually enjoy doing!

Coach Approach is designed to help you figure out your short and long term goals, create realistic fitness expectations and increase your mood and energy by helping you find tailored workouts so you will like exercising. If we can make it fun wouldn’t we do it more often?

Coach Approach & Personal Training

In a series of one-on-one meetings with a certified YMCA Wellness Coach you’ll learn how to use the fitness equipment and develop a manageable plan that will fit your needs. Your coach will stick with you in up to 6 sessions over about 6 months to answer your questions, encourage you, and help you become comfortable and productive in the gym. Read about one Y member’s experience with her Wellness Coach and then book your first Coach Approach appointment at Member Services.

Coach Approach is all about establishing and learning how to maintain a habit of exercise.

What if you already have a habit of exercise?

If you’ve already created the habit of exercise and work out a regular 2-3 times a week – good for you!

Is it time to bump it up a notch and get that little bit of help to reach your fitness goals?

Improve your body awareness and technique and get that extra push of motivation by signing up for a Personal Training Program.

Our YMCA Strength and Conditioning staff would love to help you develop or mold your exercise program. Members and non-members who have had a habit of consistent exercise for 6 months or more can sign up for this service at Member Services at any YMCA Calgary branch.

Where to start?

For me, I’ve had the idea that going to the gym could be both fun and beneficial for a while. But it’s intimidating. I don’t know what equipment to use or how much weight to lift or how many reps to do. I have a vague idea of my goals – but I don’t know how to achieve them.

My new membership at YMCA Calgary means I have access to a gym just about anytime I want. My new year’s resolution is to use it. My first step – signing up for Coach Approach.

What are your goals this new year and how are you going to achieve them? If we can, YMCA Calgary wants to help.


Book a Wellness Appointment and Find your Inner Cowboy/girl

By Rita Gore – YMCA Volunteer Writer

“Nobody’s ever listed rodeo as one of their activities” said Wellness Coach Daryl Landiak as I completed the computerized assessment part, of my Wellness appointment.

“Don’t suppose it counts, that I was once bucked off a horse?” I say.  Landiak grins, and then with a shake of his head and a firm “No,” skillfully moves me on to the next section.

Our little “back and forth” was just one of the bits of good-natured conversation that took place between Landiak and me. My appointment with him came to pass, after Lisa Kingston; Eau Claire YM Program Manager requested a blog about Wellness Coaching, how it linked to Coach Approach and Fitlinxx.

All I knew was that these one hour appointments were free, available to all members and ‘till recently, underutilized. Being hands on, I signed up.

Right from the beginning what hooked me was the interaction with Landiak, his individual attention, non-judgemental attitude and humour.  Landiak’s approach, let me relax, “admit” I’d slacked off from formal exercise then get help developing a come-back plan.

Geoff Starling, Strength and Conditioning Director at the Eau Claire YMCA, is a believer too that these personal interactions with Landiak are linked to a recent surge in Wellness Appointments, Eau Claire’s experienced.

“We made Daryl a champion of the program, since then it has taken off. Having one person in that role has made a difference. He’s very good at assessing people’s needs and knowing how to steer them” says Starling.

What‘s Changed?

Front Desk’s mantra for one. It’s become: “Welcome to the YMCA, as part of your membership you are entitled to engage in our Wellness program and have a free appt with one of our Wellness coaches. When would you like to book in?”

Offering “one-off” Wellness appointment said Starling happened because YMCA staff learned,” not everyone fits neatly into a box.”The appointments provide a “generic booking” which allow YM members to receive one-on-one help from qualified coaches to find the best program fit.

Starling says qualified Wellness coaches like Landiak,” can usually tell in few minutes whether the member will need a single appointment, a series of appointments, or neither.” In fact maybe they just want a zumba class or help prepping for tri”.

Coach Approach and Fitlinxx are but two options offered during that initial Wellness appointment. Landiak says first off though, he works to build trust and rapport.

“I give something of myself, examples from my life, because if people hear something about my life often they feel less intimidated. Just because I look fit now, does not mean that I have not had some difficulties. It works both ways though he points out, “If people don’t give me a few details about what their life is like, I won’t be able to help them as much as I could.”

Landiak is open but without crossing a line. He briefly shares that he’s experienced depression and credits exercise with getting him back on track. It’s obvious that maintaining his health and keeping fit are priorities in Landiak’s own life. His work as a Wellness Coach allows him to “transfer that belief” to others.

Landiak reports of  50 Wellness appointments booked last month- 1/3 were Coach Approach appointments, others simply a tour of the facility, or a set up on FitLinxx.

If Coach Approach is the route, Landiak helps the member identify 3 long term goals that are SMART-specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-specific. Based on these goals and particular interests, the two develop a contract.

By the second appointment, two weeks later, Landiak’s created an individual exercise program linked with Fitlinxx, an “in-house” computerized tracking system is connected to the cardiovascular equipment and a selected group of the resistant training equipment.

Exercise machines are networked into a central database, providing exercisers and staff access to a wealth of information on individual progress while it logs and records member’s fitness activity. It’s great for people who like “gadgetry.”

To monitor progress, tweak goals, review routine, and provide encouragement though, four shorter follow-up Coach Approach sessions happen monthly over 4 months.

Varity and Awareness Key:

If none of the above options fits, Landiak takes the time to figure what will, sometimes it’s how to stretch or a couple options for a certain muscle group. Once, it was a bride to be and her bride’s maid who wanted “toned arms and backs” for the wedding day.

It’s the variety of people who show up Landiak enjoys. “Some are happy go lucky, super talkative, some shy or timid or “deadly serious” -just give me the meat and potatoes, get it over with.” Those with no exercise knowledge and starting from scratch he appreciates too, “because they’ve formed no bad habits yet.”

Coach Approach Landiak believes is particularly beneficial for people who have not been exercising regularly or who are returning to exercise after a long period away. Sometimes too, he sets up fitness routine using only the Fitlinxx method, a program Starling believes is” highly underutilized.”

For more information on the Coach Approach program, please contact your YMCA branch.

Landiak believes it’s important to predict there might be obstacles to maintaining a regular exercise routine “so people don’t think they’re alone, when they experience setbacks.”

That’s why, by the second session of Coach Approach, he’s already talking relapse prevention.  Goal setting and rewards are part of the discussion too. When people don’t show up” which happens about 30% of the time with no phone call to cancel, that’s frustrating for Landiak.

In my view, they’ve missed a golden opportunity. A Wellness appointment at Eau Claire YM can provide a flexible and powerful entry point to a wide range of resources. It’s an important early intervention for new YM members and those like me, who need a “tune-up.”

Though I won’t be qualifying to compete in the 2014 Calgary Stampede rodeo, what I will take away is much better; an individualized and realistic work-out program, structured and designed by staff who care, can make me laugh and who’ll be around for support.


Book a Wellness Appointment and Find your Inner Cowboy/girl

By Rita Gore – YMCA Volunteer Writer

“Nobody’s ever listed rodeo as one of their activities” said Wellness Coach Daryl Landiak as I completed the computerized assessment part, of my Wellness appointment.

“Don’t suppose it counts, that I was once bucked off a horse?” I say.  Landiak grins, and then with a shake of his head and a firm “No,” skillfully moves me on to the next section.

Our little “back and forth” was just one of the bits of good-natured conversation that took place between Landiak and me. My appointment with him came to pass, after Lisa Kingston; Eau Claire YM Program Manager requested a blog about Wellness Coaching, how it linked to Coach Approach and Fitlinxx.

All I knew was that these one hour appointments were free, available to all members and ‘till recently, underutilized. Being hands on, I signed up.

Right from the beginning what hooked me was the interaction with Landiak, his individual attention, non-judgemental attitude and humour.  Landiak’s approach, let me relax, “admit” I’d slacked off from formal exercise then get help developing a come-back plan.

Geoff Starling, Strength and Conditioning Director at the Eau Claire YMCA, is a believer too that these personal interactions with Landiak are linked to a recent surge in Wellness Appointments, Eau Claire’s experienced.

“We made Daryl a champion of the program, since then it has taken off. Having one person in that role has made a difference. He’s very good at assessing people’s needs and knowing how to steer them” says Starling.

What‘s Changed?

Front Desk’s mantra for one. It’s become: “Welcome to the YMCA, as part of your membership you are entitled to engage in our Wellness program and have a free appt with one of our Wellness coaches. When would you like to book in?”

Offering “one-off” Wellness appointment said Starling happened because YMCA staff learned,” not everyone fits neatly into a box.”The appointments provide a “generic booking” which allow YM members to receive one-on-one help from qualified coaches to find the best program fit.

Starling says qualified Wellness coaches like Landiak,” can usually tell in few minutes whether the member will need a single appointment, a series of appointments, or neither.” In fact maybe they just want a zumba class or help prepping for tri”.

Coach Approach and Fitlinxx are but two options offered during that initial Wellness appointment. Landiak says first off though, he works to build trust and rapport.

“I give something of myself, examples from my life, because if people hear something about my life often they feel less intimidated. Just because I look fit now, does not mean that I have not had some difficulties. It works both ways though he points out, “If people don’t give me a few details about what their life is like, I won’t be able to help them as much as I could.”

Landiak is open but without crossing a line. He briefly shares that he’s experienced depression and credits exercise with getting him back on track. It’s obvious that maintaining his health and keeping fit are priorities in Landiak’s own life. His work as a Wellness Coach allows him to “transfer that belief” to others.

Landiak reports of  50 Wellness appointments booked last month- 1/3 were Coach Approach appointments, others simply a tour of the facility, or a set up on FitLinxx.

If Coach Approach is the route, Landiak helps the member identify 3 long term goals that are SMART-specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-specific. Based on these goals and particular interests, the two develop a contract.

By the second appointment, two weeks later, Landiak’s created an individual exercise program linked with Fitlinxx, an “in-house” computerized tracking system is connected to the cardiovascular equipment and a selected group of the resistant training equipment.

Exercise machines are networked into a central database, providing exercisers and staff access to a wealth of information on individual progress while it logs and records member’s fitness activity. It’s great for people who like “gadgetry.”

To monitor progress, tweak goals, review routine, and provide encouragement though, four shorter follow-up Coach Approach sessions happen monthly over 4 months.

Varity and Awareness Key:

If none of the above options fits, Landiak takes the time to figure what will, sometimes it’s how to stretch or a couple options for a certain muscle group. Once, it was a bride to be and her bride’s maid who wanted “toned arms and backs” for the wedding day.

It’s the variety of people who show up Landiak enjoys. “Some are happy go lucky, super talkative, some shy or timid or “deadly serious” -just give me the meat and potatoes, get it over with.” Those with no exercise knowledge and starting from scratch he appreciates too, “because they’ve formed no bad habits yet.”

Coach Approach Landiak believes is particularly beneficial for people who have not been exercising regularly or who are returning to exercise after a long period away. Sometimes too, he sets up fitness routine using only the Fitlinxx method, a program Starling believes is” highly underutilized.”

For more information on the Coach Approach program, please contact your YMCA branch.

Landiak believes it’s important to predict there might be obstacles to maintaining a regular exercise routine “so people don’t think they’re alone, when they experience setbacks.”

That’s why, by the second session of Coach Approach, he’s already talking relapse prevention.  Goal setting and rewards are part of the discussion too. When people don’t show up” which happens about 30% of the time with no phone call to cancel, that’s frustrating for Landiak.

In my view, they’ve missed a golden opportunity. A Wellness appointment at Eau Claire YM can provide a flexible and powerful entry point to a wide range of resources. It’s an important early intervention for new YM members and those like me, who need a “tune-up.”

Though I won’t be qualifying to compete in the 2014 Calgary Stampede rodeo, what I will take away is much better; an individualized and realistic work-out program, structured and designed by staff who care, can make me laugh and who’ll be around for support.


Sitting is the new smoking

There’s been a lot of buzz recently surrounding a slew of research outlining a case that the health effects of sitting excessively throughout the day are now overtaking the health risks attributed to smoking, and by a handsome margin. In fact, one study has the mortality rate associated with obesity as tenfold that of tobacco use (35 million deaths in the US associated to obesity versus 3.5 million for tobacco). The 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a vast campaign to socially outlaw smoking that achieved significant success in increasing the stigma attached to puffing in public and around small children. The cards now appear to be falling into place to hone this same amount of focus towards increasing the amount of physical activity we achieve each day and reducing the associated health risks of being sedentary. As Nilofer Merchant, a Silicon Valley corporate strategist puts it “sitting is the smoking of our generation”.

Besides a proposed tie to reducing the production of a cholesterol-targeting enzyme called lipase, the act of sitting itself elicits only a few minor complications like circulatory issues, low back pain and tension headaches. However it’s what we’re doing – or more like what we’re not doing – while we’re sitting that can lead to an array of far more severe comorbidities including:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Metabolic diseases and
  • Cancer

“A person with a desk job may burn [a few hundred] calories a day at work but that same person might burn [several thousand] in a job that requires considerable physical effort” says James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. Considering we’re sitting an average of 9.7hrs a day and sleeping another 7.7hrs, that doesn’t leave a lot of time for actively sparking our metabolism and attending to our personal health.

This doesn’t mean you have to change careers and become a carpenter with an ultra-marathon running side gig, it may be as simple as creating potential for activity throughout your daily life e.g. taking the stairs instead of the elevator when you go for breaks, parking at the back of the lot instead of the spot closest to the entrance or simply doing a couple of laps around the office on your way to the washroom. For the executives out there, why not introduce ‘walking meetings’ into your weekly schedule. “Instead of going to a coffee meeting or the conference room, I ask people to go on a walking meeting” says Merchant. “There’s something about getting physically out of the box that leads to out-of the-box thinking. You’ll be surprised how fresh air drives fresh thinking”.

There are also ways of ‘actively sitting’ including raising your desk to standing height, dialing in to meetings while you’re on the treadmill or, better still, ordering a treadmill-equipped desk! (Google “treadmill desk”). And just in case you thought this was some kind of modern revelation, here are some renowned ‘active thinkers’ of our time; Winston Churchill, Charles Dickens, Benjamin Franklin, Ernest Hemmingway and Mark Twain.

For more great ideas on how to expand your time away from sitting, check out this clip from Dr Mike Evans, Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of Toronto entitled “23 and a half hours”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUaInS6HIGo
Geoff Starling
Strength & Conditioning Director
Eau Claire YMCA
gstarlin@calgary.ymca.ca


Sitting is the new smoking

There’s been a lot of buzz recently surrounding a slew of research outlining a case that the health effects of sitting excessively throughout the day are now overtaking the health risks attributed to smoking, and by a handsome margin. In fact, one study has the mortality rate associated with obesity as tenfold that of tobacco use (35 million deaths in the US associated to obesity versus 3.5 million for tobacco). The 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a vast campaign to socially outlaw smoking that achieved significant success in increasing the stigma attached to puffing in public and around small children. The cards now appear to be falling into place to hone this same amount of focus towards increasing the amount of physical activity we achieve each day and reducing the associated health risks of being sedentary. As Nilofer Merchant, a Silicon Valley corporate strategist puts it “sitting is the smoking of our generation”.

Besides a proposed tie to reducing the production of a cholesterol-targeting enzyme called lipase, the act of sitting itself elicits only a few minor complications like circulatory issues, low back pain and tension headaches. However it’s what we’re doing – or more like what we’re not doing – while we’re sitting that can lead to an array of far more severe comorbidities including:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Metabolic diseases and
  • Cancer

“A person with a desk job may burn [a few hundred] calories a day at work but that same person might burn [several thousand] in a job that requires considerable physical effort” says James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. Considering we’re sitting an average of 9.7hrs a day and sleeping another 7.7hrs, that doesn’t leave a lot of time for actively sparking our metabolism and attending to our personal health.

This doesn’t mean you have to change careers and become a carpenter with an ultra-marathon running side gig, it may be as simple as creating potential for activity throughout your daily life e.g. taking the stairs instead of the elevator when you go for breaks, parking at the back of the lot instead of the spot closest to the entrance or simply doing a couple of laps around the office on your way to the washroom. For the executives out there, why not introduce ‘walking meetings’ into your weekly schedule. “Instead of going to a coffee meeting or the conference room, I ask people to go on a walking meeting” says Merchant. “There’s something about getting physically out of the box that leads to out-of the-box thinking. You’ll be surprised how fresh air drives fresh thinking”.

There are also ways of ‘actively sitting’ including raising your desk to standing height, dialing in to meetings while you’re on the treadmill or, better still, ordering a treadmill-equipped desk! (Google “treadmill desk”). And just in case you thought this was some kind of modern revelation, here are some renowned ‘active thinkers’ of our time; Winston Churchill, Charles Dickens, Benjamin Franklin, Ernest Hemmingway and Mark Twain.

For more great ideas on how to expand your time away from sitting, check out this clip from Dr Mike Evans, Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of Toronto entitled “23 and a half hours”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUaInS6HIGo
Geoff Starling
Strength & Conditioning Director
Eau Claire YMCA
gstarlin@calgary.ymca.ca


Staying Motivated – Tip #14

Make It Fun.
Increased activity can be here, there or anywhere!  Include the kids, your dog, a friend, or anyone else you can to help keep you engaged and get them moving too!  Playing tag, walking the dog, even walking around the mall all count.
It doesn’t have to be as structured as a gym workout. Try a class, the climbing wall, or even join a recreation sports team!


Staying Motivated – Tip #13

Music Makes the Workout.
fill your MP3 with your favourites! A playlist will your favourite songs will certainly get you going more than the background noise in the gym. 
Lose yourself in the music. 
Create a playlist that compliments your workout; try running/jogging for an entire song, walk the next!


Staying Motivated – Tip #8

Make It A Habit.
Adding in a lifestyle change as part of your routine will make this new part of your life become like second nature.  If you find a class, workout, opening in the pool, etc… that works for your schedule, stick with it.  We are creatures of habit, so give those healthy habits the chance to grow and succeed.


Staying Motivated – Tip #7

Make a Friend.
Introduce yourself to someone.  Staff, volunteers, other members; we’re a friendly family at the YMCA! Group fitness classes and weight training are great ways to meet people with similar interests and goals to yours.


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